Vision Science Research Group

Paediatric Research

    Paediatric Research

    The, Paediatric Vision Research team at the University of Ulster is interested in visual function in infancy and childhood. In addition to conducting research exploring typical visual development we are interested in the structural and functional impacts of developmental disorders on the maturing visual system.

    Our research aims to improve understanding of typical and atypical visual development with a view to optimising vision care for children and developing an evidence-base for the eye care professions. Our work involves collaboration with other eye care professionals and researchers as well as stakeholders including parents, schools, paediatricians and teachers of the visually impaired. We recognise the importance of dissemination and translation of research findings beyond the scientific community to practitioners, clinicians, parents and charities and have developed links with all these stakeholders in order to maximise the impact of our research.

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    The Paediatric Vision Research Team


    Research Projects

    We are involved in several research projects investigating visual function in:


    Collaborative Working

    The Paediatric Vision Research team have a wealth of experience recruiting and working with infants and children of all ages and abilities and much of our research data collection occurs in schools, health centres and hospitals. An important component of our work is collaboration with other eye care professionals and researchers as well as stakeholders including parents, schools, paediatricians and teachers of the visually impaired. We recognise the importance of dissemination and translation of research findings beyond the scientific community to practitioners, clinicians, parents and charities and have links with all these stakeholders in order to maximise the impact of our research.


    Developing Assessment Tools

    The importance of improving clinical assessment and management of patients is also the impetus behind the group’s development of a commercial tool for the objective assessment of focusing. The Ulster-Cardiff Accommodation Rule (or UC-Cube), developed in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff University, is the first commercially available tool that allows rapid, clinical assessment of focusing accuracy without the need for the patient to communicate. This is particularly important when assessing children with special needs as our research and that of others has shown that this group are at high risk for poor focusing which will impact on vision and learning if left undetected and unmanaged. The device provides normative data with which to compare clinical measures. It will be launched on the commercial market in 2011 and its launch has already received a great deal of interest from the profession.